Indigo Dyeing

Shibori is an ancient Japanese handwork resist-dyeing technique that dates back to the 8th century. The technique dates back to a time when slow, intricate handwork was the prevailing method of adding color to fabric. Shibori’s appeal has seemingly ramped up in recent years and can be seen in many examples of home design.

Jeffrey Alan Marks Bombora Pacific

Shibori delivers an instant artisanal look and feel to fabrics. It’s a fabric manipulation technique traditionally done with indigo, during which fabric is either plucked, stitched, folded, twisted, crumpled or plaited by hand before the dyeing process begins.

Linherr Hollingsworth Baturi Indigo

Once dye is applied to the cloth, the parts that are secured by gathers or compressed, resist the dye, transforming the fabric from two-dimensional into three-dimensional form, creating soft- or blurred-edge patterns.

F. Schumacher Andromeda Indigo Drapes, Chair

The shibori dyeing method works in tandem with the fabric, giving it liberty to shape into its natural form as it reacts to the dye. This creates unique, one-of-a-kind patterns, because no matter how exact the method, no two will ever create the same design.

Kravet Baturi Indigo

There are six major shibori techniques, each with its own set of steps to create its own patterns and texture once the dye is added. The ancient art of indigo dyeing has been around for centuries, passed down through generations of artisans around the world. Get inspired by this time-honored trade with these striking hues from all of our brands.