Happy Festivus!

On December 23rd you may choose to celebrate Festivus. I thought it would be fun to learn more about this made up holiday, enjoy.

Festivus is a secular holiday, normally celebrated on December 23rd. It is mainly meant as an alternative to the pressures and commercialization of the Christmas season. However, it has also become a day to celebrate the ever-lasting comedy of the 1990s television show Seinfeld.

Festivus was a holiday featured in the Season 9 Seinfeld episode “The Strike”, which first aired on December 18, 1997. Since then, many people have been inspired by this zany, offbeat Seinfeld holiday and now celebrate Festivus as any other holiday.

According to the Seinfeld model, Festivus is celebrated on December 23rd. However many people celebrate it other times in December and even at other times throughout the year.

The usual holiday tradition of a tree is manifested in an unadorned aluminum pole, which is in direct contrast to normal holiday materialism. Those attending Festivus may also participate in the “Airing of Grievances” which is an opportunity to tell others how they have disappointed you in the past year, followed by a Festivus dinner, and then completed by the “Feats of Strength” where the head of the household must be pinned. All of these traditions are based upon the events in the Seinfeld episode, Strangely enough, our Festivus traditions also have roots that pre-date Seinfeld, as it began in the household of Dan O’Keefe, a television writer who is credited for writing the Seinfeld episode.

The traditional greeting of Festivus is “Happy Festivus.” The slogan of Festivus is “A Festivus for the rest of us!

Happy Labor Day Weekend

Happy Labor Day from DrapeStyle!

Here is a little information about Labor Day, courtesy of Wikipedia:

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day Weekend and it is considered the unofficial end of summer.

Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. “Labor Day” was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon was the first state of the United States to make it an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty U.S. states officially celebrated this holiday.

Dupioni Bordered Silk Drapes in Cashmere and Graphite
Dupioni Bordered Silk Drapes in Cashmere and Graphite

DrapeStyle will be closed Monday, September 3rd.  We will be back on Tuesday to help you with your window treatment needs!  In the meantime, please browse our website for inspiration and information about the most beautiful custom drapes available today!  We can make any width or length drape in over 600 fabrics.  And with a team of talented seamstress, you are sure to receive the highest quality draperypillows and Roman shades.

If you need a little advice or would like to order fabric swatches, please let us know.

We have been in business for over 15 years, if you appreciate good design and superior quality DrapeStyle is your answer. And as always, your window treatments will be made right here in the USA.

Happy National Argyle Day!

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NATIONAL ARGYLE DAY

This week we celebrate National Argyle Day. Who knew this even existed, right? Here is a little information about the fabric.

Deriving from the tartan of Clan Campbell, of Argyle in western Scotland, the argyle pattern used for kilts and plaids and from the patterned socks (known as “tartan hose”). Worn by Scottish Highlanders since at least the 17th century, is recognized and honored each year on January 8th on National Argyle Day

blue-argyle-romper-setMost commonly referring to the overall pattern made of diamonds or lozenges, the word “argyle” sometimes is used referring to an individual diamond in the design. Layers of overlapping motifs are found in most layouts adding a sense of three-dimensionality, movement and texture.  Typically in the pattern, there is an overlay of inter-crossing diagonal lines on solid diamonds.

 

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The design’s popularity was helped by its identification with the Duke of Windsor, Pringle of Scotland (a luxury knitwear manufacturer and importer).  The duke, like many others, used the pattern for golf clothing on both jerseys and long socks that were needed for the plus-fours trouser fashion of the day.

16 Argyle Projects for Argyle Day

What do you do on National Argyle Day? I really don’t know. But I found a website that came up with some fun projects. Click the link above for some crafty, fun ideas. And please view our website. We don’t carry argyle fabric, but we have many fabrics that would coordinate with your argyle sofa!

In fact, DrapeStyle carries over 500 fabrics that can be made into the drapes of your dreams. Please contact one of our designers for more details or questions about ordering custom made drapes, Roman shades and pillows. We love helping our customers design their dream drapes, and it shows. DrapeStyle has been awarded the Best of Houzz in customer service three years in a row. Please join us in the DrapeStyle experience, you will be pleased!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

This week we will celebrate Thanksgiving here at DrapeStyle, in Phoenix, Arizona. On the Monday before Thanksgiving, everyone brings a food item to share for lunch. We do this on Monday so that we can enjoy the delicious leftovers all week!  We line up all of the food offerings on a table outside the break room, set up extra tables in the break room, and we fill our plates (some of us more than once!) with delicious food. It is rare that we all get to eat together at the same time, so it’s a wonderful way to start our long holiday weekend.

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We are so thankful for so many things, but especially our customers. If it wasn’t for you, we wouldn’t be here! So we try to take great care of you. From the time you order fabric samples, to adding the finishing touches to your window treatments, we will be here to assist you every step of the way. Whether it’s by phone or email, feel free to reach out to us.

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This week, DrapeStyle will be closed Thursday through Sunday, and we will back in the office on Monday, November 28th to assist you. We hope you and your family have a wonderful and safe holiday weekend!

Happy National Button Day!

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National Button Day is observed annually on November 16. Founded in 1938, the National Button Society recognized button collecting as an organized hobby. This is a celebration day for all button collectors, skilled and novice.

The appeal of buttons is clear. They come in every shape, color and style, from pearly white shirt buttons, to ornate Victorian affairs, to cute fastenings shaped like insects and animals. Any outfit can be updated by adding the right buttons, and sewing them on is one of the easiest types of needlework to learn. And they don’t just belong near buttonholes, either. Clusters of buttons can be used to decorate almost everything, and even on their own in jars they are delightful to handle, play with and admire. Some collect them, but most just lose them. Regardless, nearly everyone seems to love them, or at least regard them with fascination.

In case you may be thinking that buttons do not deserve their own holiday, try to imagine what life would be like without them. Sure, we have zippers and velcro, but could you imagine velcro down the front of your elegant blouse? Of course not!

wooden-font-b-button-b-font-font-b-art-b-font-diy-handmade-flower-butterfly-eagleButton, usually disk like piece of solid material having holes or a shank through which it is sewed to one side of an article of clothing and used to fasten or close the garment by passing through a loop or hole in the other side. Purely decorative, non-utilitarian buttons are also frequently used on clothing.

In medieval Europe, garments were laced together or fastened with brooches or clasps and points, until buttonholes were invented in the 13th century. Then buttons became so prominent that in some places sumptuary laws were passed putting limits on their use.

By the 14th century buttons were worn as ornaments and fastenings from the elbow to the wrist and from the neckline to the waist. The wearing of gold, silver, and ivory buttons was an indication of wealth and rank. Expensive buttons were also made of copper and its alloys. The metalsmith frequently embellished such buttons with insets of ivory, tortoiseshell, and jewels. More commonly, buttons were made of bone or wood. Button forms of these materials were also used as foundations for fabric-covered buttons. Thread buttons were made by wrapping the thread over a wire ring.

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In the 18th century luxury metals and ivory largely replaced fabric, although embroidered buttons in designs to complement particular garments were popular. Pewter, the familiar metal of the age, was used to make molded or stamped-out buttons, but these were scorned by the wealthy. Cast brass buttons, particularly calamine brass, with ornamental and distinguishing designs, also became popular on both military and civilian dress.

In the middle of the 18th century, Matthew Boulton, the English manufacturer and partner of James Watt, introduced the bright, costly, cut-steel button, which was made by attaching polished steel facets to a steel blank. In France the facets of the cut-steel button were elaborated by openwork designs. During the first quarter of the 19th century, a less costly stamped steel button was made in an openwork pattern. Brass buttons that were gilded by dipping in an amalgam of mercury and gold also became popular.

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The two-shell metal button was introduced about the same time as the stamped-steel type by B. Sanders, a Danish manufacturer in England. The two shells, thin metal disks enclosing a small piece of cloth or pasteboard, were crimped together on the edges. Sanders also originated the canvas shank. By 1830 fabric-covered buttons were being made mechanically. Also coming into use were animal horns and hoofs, which could be made malleable by heating and then could be cut, dyed, and molded.

Buttons were also made of ceramics and glass. Porcelain buttons became a French specialty; they were decorated by hand painting or by transfer printing designs using colored inks. Bohemia, in the present-day Czech Republic, produced most of the colored glass used in button manufacture.

In Japan, ceramic buttons, hand painted in traditional motifs, were developed. Buttons with an intricately carved thickness of vermilion lacquer on a wooden base became a Chinese specialty, and decorated and lacquered papier-mâché buttons became popular in Europe in the late 1800s.

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The use of the pearly shells of sea mollusks in button making increased with the mechanization of production. Shell was separated into its component layers by treatment with a nitric acid solution, and blanks were cut out by tubular saws. Holes were bored in the blanks for sewing, and an engraved decoration was mechanically applied. At first only seashell was used, but in the 1890’s the American manufacturer John F. Boepple began to use the less iridescent but abundant freshwater mussel shells found along the Mississippi River and its tributaries.

In the 20th century, buttons became primarily utilitarian, not decorative, and in many applications were supplanted by the zipper. Buttons began to be made of plastics such as cellulose, polystyrene, and polyvinyl resins; designs tended to be abstract or geometric. Mass-production machines produce molded buttons either by compressing powdered plastics or by injection—forcing liquid plastic into individual molds through small openings.

Some old buttons are considered valuable and are collected for their art and workmanship. The place, date, and name of the maker are usually marked on their backs.

Originally published by: ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA

www.britannica.com/topic/button-clothing-accessory

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Guaranteed Thanksgiving Delivery on Custom Drapes and Shades

HURRY & SAVE UP TO 20% FOR THE HOLIDAYS!  GUARANTEED THANKSGIVING DELIVERY ON CUSTOM DRAPES, ROMAN SHADES & PILLOWS. SAVE $50 and GET FREE SHIPPING!

Striped Silk Taffeta Drapes
Striped Silk Taffeta Drapes with Emperor Tassel

Fall weather brings to mind warm colors, festive foods and pumpkin spiced everything.

Thinking about refreshing your home by adding custom drapes, roman shadespillows and drapery hardware before the holidays?    There’s not a better time than now to start thinking about placing your order for custom window treatments.  Everything at DrapeStyle is custom made with the finest exclusive fabrics and the highest quality workmanship.  For over a decade, DrapeStyle has been making everything right here in the USA and is proud to deliver quality and style you won’t find anywhere else.

 

DrapeStyle offers hundreds of fabrics including silk, linen, cotton, and polyester blends that can be made into any style drape, curtain or roman shade.  We also feature designer fabrics from Schumacher, Robert Allen, Kravet and Vern Yip.  The customization continues with your choice of lining; sateen, interlining, bump or blackout lining.

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If you’re thinking about updating your home for the holidays, you won’t find a better selection than at www.drapestyle.com.  If you need a little advice, we’re here to help.  Our designers are happy to assist you with your order.  So whether your order consists of drapes, roman shades or pillows, order by October 21st and use coupon code 245 and receive $50 off.  And take comfort in knowing that you are guaranteed Thanksgiving delivery*.

See www.drapestyle.com for details and exclusions.

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*Free delivery indicates standard UPS ground delivery for the contiguous U.S. states only.  Applies to in stock fabric for Custom Drapes and Roman Shades only.

Oversized items, drapery hardware, and rush deliveries may incur additional charges. Please see website for complete details and exclusions.

Use coupon code 245 at checkout and receive $50 off your order of $999 or more.  New orders only, cannot be combined with any other offer.

Happy Labor Day Weekend!

labor-day-weekendHappy Labor Day from DrapeStyle!

Here is a little information about Labor Day, courtesy of Wikipedia:

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day Weekend and it is considered the unofficial end of summer.

Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. “Labor Day” was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon was the first state of the United States to make it an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty U.S. states officially celebrated Labor Day.

Dupioni Bordered Silk Drapes in Cashmere and Graphite
Dupioni Bordered Silk Drapes in Cashmere and Graphite

DrapeStyle will be closed Monday, September 5th in honor of Labor Day.  We will be back on Tuesday to help you with your window treatment needs!  In the meantime, browse our website for inspiration and information about the most beautiful custom drapes available today!  We can make any width or length drape in over 400 fabrics.  And with a team of talented seamstress, you are sure to receive the highest quality drapery, pillows and Roman shades.

If you have any questions about drapery pricing, please feel free to contact us. We love helping our customers design their dream drapes.Maybe that’s why DrapeStyle has been awarded Best of Houzz in Customer Service three years in a row. We invite you to read our Houzz reviews and join us in the DrapeStyle experience. You will be pleased.

Happy “Thread The Needle Day”

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Happy “Thread The Needle Day”.  Who knew there was such a thing, right?

Although the statement could have several meanings, I’ve decided to focus on the more literal meaning.  Today can be all about sewing or learning to sew.  I occasionally sew, and maybe this will be the push I need to finish some of the sewing projects I have started.  What about you?  Have you ever wanted to learn to sew?

Before investing in a good machine, it might be a good idea to take a few sewing classes at your local craft store.  This will give you a good idea of the time and patience you’ll need to take up sewing as a hobby.

Keep an open mind.  Know that learning anything new, takes time to master the task and get good at it.  When I was learning to sew, I can remember having to take my seam ripper to many projects because I sewed together the wrong pieces, or sewed on the wrong side, etc.  Practice, practice, practice.  You can inexpensively practice your sewing skills on thrift store sheets and bargain thread.  Start with simple projects so that you can fine tune your skills.  And if you have an experienced friend that you can go to for questions, that can be tremendously helpful.

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Make things you like.  If  you have a genuine interest in what you’re making, you’re more likely to stick with it.  When I started sewing, I had a cousin that was a toddler.  That poor kid had the cutest, silliest, outfits made for him.  His mother was kind enough to actually have him wear them (or at least long enough to take pictures and send them to me).  Those photos will be great for embarrassing him later in life.

Search the internet.  Pinterest and You Tube have great ideas and how to tutorials.  I always find visuals much more helpful than written instructions.

Now, if you find that your sewing skills aren’t up to par and you need a little assistance for your window treatment project, contact DrapeStyle.  We have been making custom Drapes, Roman Shades and Pillows since 2002.  Our seamstresses have an average of 25 years experience so you are sure to get premium products, quality craftsmanship and a great price.

Happy Independence Day!

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DrapeStyle wishes you and your family a happy 4th of July.  In honor of our nations independence, here is a little information about our country’s flag:

The national flag of the United States of America consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton (referred to specifically as the “union”), bearing fifty small, white, five-pointed starts arranged in nine offset horizontal rows of six stars (top and bottom) alternating with rows of five stars.  The 50 stars on the flag represent the 50 state of the United states of America, and the thirteen stripes represent the thirteen British colonies that declared independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain and became the first states in the United States.

The current design of the U.S. flag is its 27th.  The design of the flag has been modified officially 26 times since 1777.  The 48-star flag was in effect for 47 years until the 49-star version became official on July 4, 1959.  The 50-star flag was ordered by former president Eisenhower on August 21, 1959 and was adopted in July 1960. It is the longest-used version of the U.S. flag and has been in use for over 55 years.

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Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey, a naval flag designer, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, designed the 1777 flag while he was the Chairman of the Continental Navy Board’s Middle Department.

The origin of the stars and stripes design has been muddled by a story disseminated by the descendants of Betsy Ross. The apocryphal story credits Betsy Ross for sewing the first flag from a pencil sketch handed to her by George Washington. No evidence for this exists either in the diaries of George Washington nor in the records of the Continental Congress. Indeed, nearly a century passed before Ross’ grandson, William Canby, first publicly suggested the story in 1870.  By her family’s own admission, Ross ran an upholstery business, and she had never made a flag as of the supposed visit in June 1776.  Furthermore, her grandson admitted that his own search through the Journals of Congress and other official records failed to find corroboration of his grandmother’s story.

The family of Rebecca Young claimed that she sewed the first flag.  Young’s daughter was Mary Pickersgill, who made the Star Spangled Banner Flag.  According to rumor, the Washington family coat of arms, shown in a 15th-century window of Selby Abbey, was the origin of the stars and stripes.

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The flag is customarily flown year-round at most public buildings, and it is not unusual to find private houses flying full-size flags.  Some private use is year-round, but becomes widespread on civic holidays like Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Presidents’ Day, Flag Day, and on Independence Day.  On Memorial Day it is common to place small flags by war memorials and next to the graves of U.S. war veterans.  Also on Memorial Day it is common to fly the flag at half staff, until noon, in remembrance of those who lost their lives fighting in U.S. wars.

So today, fly your flag proudly in honor of America’s Independence.  DrapeStyle will be closed on Monday, July 4th.  We will be back on the 5th to help you with your window treatment needs.  In the meantime, you may contact us and leave a message, and we contact you when we return.

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