7 Paint Colors We’re Loving for Kitchen Cabinets in 2020

Reposted from SouthernLiving.com

As one of (if not the) most important room in the home, the kitchen can be an overwhelming space to decorate. With multiple purposes—from cooking and hosting to even eating within—kitchens must be simultaneously soothing, stylish, clean, and comforting, which leads many homeowners, by default, to the ubiquitous all-white kitchen. But next year, some designers are predicting a sea change, with more homeowners opting to spice things up with everything from bold, dramatic shades to new takes on neutrals. And where’s the easiest place to bring a game-changing dose of color to the kitchen? The cabinets. Here are seven on-the-rise shades we’re currently obsessed with for kitchen cabinets.

Navy Blue

Try: Sherwin-Williams’s Naval

While this rich navy was recently crowned the Color of the Year by trend forecasters at Sherwin-Williams, it’s gaining particular attention as a go-to hue for kitchens. As more homeowners lean toward moodier hues, navy is a solid entry point: It’s just as neutral as white or gray in that it pairs well with a variety of colors, textures, and styles, but brings a little more drama and interest to the table than your average greige.

Sage Green

Try: Pewter Green by Sherwin-Williams

Back in 2018, earthy hues started making their meteoric rise in the design world, with Pinterest saves, specifically, skyrocketing for sage. Soon after, this subdued gray-green solidified itself as a go-to neutral for homeowners. And trend experts—including the forecasters at Behr, who recently deemed the yellow-tinged Back to Nature the top hue of 2020—seem to believe that earthy greens are here to stay. In this kitchen, the sage cabinets help to ground the lofty space while surrounding walls painted a soft gray-blue (Sherwin-Williams’s Oyster Bay) keep the darker shade from feeling too dramatic.

Matte Black

Try: Onyx by Benjamin Moore

It might seem a bold choice, but black-and-white is becoming as mainstream a color combo in the kitchen as, well, white and white. The secret is in the high contrast, says Fixer Upper’s Joanna Gaines, which adds a ‘wow’ factor to even the most basic of kitchens. To pull off the look, make sure to maintain an equal balance between the two hues, with black cladding the lower cabinetry and island (for example) and bright whites reserved for the kitchen’s upper half. Adding warm woods to the mix tones down the color duo’s modern vibe.

Barely Blue

Try: Parma Gray by Farrow & Ball

If you’re among those who find it hard to part with the familiarity and timelessness of an all-white kitchen, meet the match that might just pull you out of your comfort zone. Pale blues are perfect gateways to pigment for the color averse, not only because they deliver the same clean and crisp vibe of their neutral counterparts, but also because of their psychological benefits—the color blue makes people feel cool, calm, and collected, the perfect vibe for hardworking kitchens.

Blush Pink

Try: Galveston Tan by Dunn-Edwards

Maybe it’s in response to the decade’s obsession with Millennial Pink or in spite of it, but rosy hues don’t seem to be going anywhere soon. This year, no less than two paint brands have declared variations of blush their ultimate colors of the year for 2020—a soft pink hue with apricot influences for HGTV Home by Sherwin-Williams, dubbed Romance, and an uplifting “new neutral” from Benjamin Moore named First Light. Thanks to its lightness and versatility, blush is an easy replacement for anywhere you’d naturally gravitate toward beige or white, including in the kitchen. The difference is it brings in a dose of color that can take a space from basic to beautiful in an instant.

Light Gray

Try: Tinsmith by Sherwin-Williams

When most homeowners go for monochromatic in the kitchen, they’ll opt for a timeless bright white. But trend experts have long surmised that soft grays will soon overtake the ever-popular paint shade as the de facto neutral—and in 2020, they could be right. According to home remodeling site Houzz, light, versatile grays are on the rise in kitchens, perhaps in response to the growing popularity of moodier hues. In our 2019 Idea House in Crane Island, Florida, we opted for a soothing shade with hints of blue to evoke the feel of the ocean at dusk.  

Peacock Blue

Try: Water Garden by Magnolia Home

If you’ve been paying attention to color trends within the past year, it wouldn’t take long realize that jewel tones are having a serious moment. From ruby and emerald to sapphire and citrine, these rich, saturated shades can make a dramatic statement as an accent wall or bring just the right amount of colorful flair when used in smaller doses. One perpetual crowd pleaser? Peacock, a deeper version of turquoise that’s stylish yet soothing (it’s reminiscent of the sea, after all). Pair it with bright white in a two-toned kitchen, a la this Fixer Upper classic, to transform your cooking space into an instant gem.


The Art of Handcrafted Textiles

Reposted from Fabricut’s blog:

There is something unmistakably appealing about the handmade. The rich history of textiles as one of the oldest forms of art continues to influence textile design today, with handmade techniques passed down through generations of textile designers. As we continue to find inspiration in handcrafted textiles, we’ve pulled together several new products developed with handcrafting processes and images of the artisans at work.

Employing handcrafting techniques including screen printing, fabrics like Ion Damask are printed at our mill by artisans who apply the pattern by hand down the bolt of fabric. Ion Damask’s natural linen ground is the perfect backdrop for the hand-screened damask design, bringing a more relaxed look ideal for bohemian or globally inspired interiors.

Using the same screen printing technique, pattern Amaris Stripe’s small-scale design is printed onto a cotton/linen blend ground. Hand-screening the fabric design lends the fabric a uniqueness unlike anything made entirely by machine.

If you are interested in any of Fabricut’s fabrics, let us know! DrapeStyle can custom make draperies, Roman shades or pillows in any of Fabricut’s fabrics. Contact us for more information.

National Button Day

November 16th is National Button Day! Here are some fun facts about buttons. Reposted from:https://nationaltoday.com/national-button-day/

Once simply ornamental in nature, the button as a means to fasten clothes has been around since 13th century Germany. Since then, a wide variety of materials like wood, clay, shells, and plastic have been used to make buttons in every size, shape, and color. A button jar can morph into a great craft project, extra game tokens, or fashion embellishment. Sure, we have zippers and Velcro now, but buttons are just more fun, interesting, and whimsical. Buttons can even be works of art, so take time to appreciate those useful, pretty little things on National Button Day.

National Button Day – History

Buttoned up button

​2014-A button that was once part of a Texas confederate navy uniform circa the Civil War sold for over $2,000.​

​Muscatine, Iowa became pearl button capital of the world

​1900-Noting the abundance of pearl mussels in nearby waters, a German immigrant opened a button-making factory in small town Iowa, which soon grew to be the largest manufacturer of pearl buttons in the world.

Button-down collars invented

1896-​Polo players were the first to button down their collars to stop them from getting in the way during a match; Brooks Brothers copied the look and created a lasting trend in 1896.​

​The church denounced buttons

​1300-Europe was so button crazy, the church started calling them the “devil’s snare.” This was probably because most women’s clothing of the time buttoned up the front.​

Button Makers Guild established

​1250-The French established the first collective that designed artisan buttons, making buttons a status symbol.

National Button Day Activities

  1. Upcycle with buttons-Have a shirt you don’t wear anymore? Change out the buttons and make it new again. Sew on some shiny metal buttons to give it an on-trend military look, or sew on kitschy novelty buttons to reflect your favorite hobby, animal, or even food. Be unique, original, and eco-friendly all at the same time.
  2. Go on a treasure hunt-Hit a thrift shop, rummage, or garage sale. Be on the lookout for old clothing with unique buttons. Collectors love finding ones depicting mini works of art, that were worn by famous people, or reflect a certain era. Research to see if any of your finds are worth more than what you paid.
  3. Start a button jar-Snip buttons from unused pieces of clothing, claim ones you find lying loose, buy novelty ones when it strikes your fancy, or pick ones up on the cheap when thrifting. Then, the next time you need a button, you’ll have a big variety of sizes, shapes and colors from which to choose.

​3 Facts To Really Push Your Buttons

  1. What side you button up on is gender-based​-Women’s clothing traditionally buttons on the right (reportedly because it was easier for maids to dress the ladies they served that way) and men’s on the left (they dressed themselves).
  2. Boutonnière means buttonhole in French​-Boutonnieres go through a little slit in the lapel of men’s jackets that looks the same as a buttonhole, so we repurposed the French word for buttonhole to describe the flower in English.
  3. ​Buttons on uniform sleeves were put there to stop soldiers from wiping their noses​-Widely repeated but never satisfactorily confirmed, it is said that Napoleon ordered brass buttons be placed on the sleeves of all military uniforms so soldiers would be discouraged from wiping their noses on them.

Why Buy Single Drapery Panels?

Why does DrapeStyle sell their drapes individually?

I get this question quite often. I explain to clients that sometimes it might be more convenient to have one drape. And other times the window may only require one drape. Let me explain. You may have a narrow window and one drape is more than enough to cover the window.

You may have a window on either side of your bed or a fireplace, for example. Space might be limited, but you require privacy or you may just want to add color or texture to the space. Or sometimes reaching behind the bed to open and close your window treatments isn’t possible.

One drape can be beautiful and functional, and may cost a bit less than two! A sliding glass door would be another application for one drape. Does your slider open on one side? Is the wall space limited on one side of the slider? Would it be easier if your view wasn’t block and one drape stacked to the side of the slider?

If you need a little design advice or help with determining what size drapery you need, please contact us. DrapeStyle has been in business for over 15 years and we love helping customers design their dream drapes! Whether you need one drape or two, we can create a look for you within your budget that you will love!