Happy National Button Day!

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National Button Day is observed annually on November 16. Founded in 1938, the National Button Society recognized button collecting as an organized hobby. This is a celebration day for all button collectors, skilled and novice.

The appeal of buttons is clear. They come in every shape, color and style, from pearly white shirt buttons, to ornate Victorian affairs, to cute fastenings shaped like insects and animals. Any outfit can be updated by adding the right buttons, and sewing them on is one of the easiest types of needlework to learn. And they don’t just belong near buttonholes, either. Clusters of buttons can be used to decorate almost everything, and even on their own in jars they are delightful to handle, play with and admire. Some collect them, but most just lose them. Regardless, nearly everyone seems to love them, or at least regard them with fascination.

In case you may be thinking that buttons do not deserve their own holiday, try to imagine what life would be like without them. Sure, we have zippers and velcro, but could you imagine velcro down the front of your elegant blouse? Of course not!

wooden-font-b-button-b-font-font-b-art-b-font-diy-handmade-flower-butterfly-eagleButton, usually disk like piece of solid material having holes or a shank through which it is sewed to one side of an article of clothing and used to fasten or close the garment by passing through a loop or hole in the other side. Purely decorative, non-utilitarian buttons are also frequently used on clothing.

In medieval Europe, garments were laced together or fastened with brooches or clasps and points, until buttonholes were invented in the 13th century. Then buttons became so prominent that in some places sumptuary laws were passed putting limits on their use.

By the 14th century buttons were worn as ornaments and fastenings from the elbow to the wrist and from the neckline to the waist. The wearing of gold, silver, and ivory buttons was an indication of wealth and rank. Expensive buttons were also made of copper and its alloys. The metalsmith frequently embellished such buttons with insets of ivory, tortoiseshell, and jewels. More commonly, buttons were made of bone or wood. Button forms of these materials were also used as foundations for fabric-covered buttons. Thread buttons were made by wrapping the thread over a wire ring.

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In the 18th century luxury metals and ivory largely replaced fabric, although embroidered buttons in designs to complement particular garments were popular. Pewter, the familiar metal of the age, was used to make molded or stamped-out buttons, but these were scorned by the wealthy. Cast brass buttons, particularly calamine brass, with ornamental and distinguishing designs, also became popular on both military and civilian dress.

In the middle of the 18th century, Matthew Boulton, the English manufacturer and partner of James Watt, introduced the bright, costly, cut-steel button, which was made by attaching polished steel facets to a steel blank. In France the facets of the cut-steel button were elaborated by openwork designs. During the first quarter of the 19th century, a less costly stamped steel button was made in an openwork pattern. Brass buttons that were gilded by dipping in an amalgam of mercury and gold also became popular.

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The two-shell metal button was introduced about the same time as the stamped-steel type by B. Sanders, a Danish manufacturer in England. The two shells, thin metal disks enclosing a small piece of cloth or pasteboard, were crimped together on the edges. Sanders also originated the canvas shank. By 1830 fabric-covered buttons were being made mechanically. Also coming into use were animal horns and hoofs, which could be made malleable by heating and then could be cut, dyed, and molded.

Buttons were also made of ceramics and glass. Porcelain buttons became a French specialty; they were decorated by hand painting or by transfer printing designs using colored inks. Bohemia, in the present-day Czech Republic, produced most of the colored glass used in button manufacture.

In Japan, ceramic buttons, hand painted in traditional motifs, were developed. Buttons with an intricately carved thickness of vermilion lacquer on a wooden base became a Chinese specialty, and decorated and lacquered papier-mâché buttons became popular in Europe in the late 1800s.

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The use of the pearly shells of sea mollusks in button making increased with the mechanization of production. Shell was separated into its component layers by treatment with a nitric acid solution, and blanks were cut out by tubular saws. Holes were bored in the blanks for sewing, and an engraved decoration was mechanically applied. At first only seashell was used, but in the 1890’s the American manufacturer John F. Boepple began to use the less iridescent but abundant freshwater mussel shells found along the Mississippi River and its tributaries.

In the 20th century, buttons became primarily utilitarian, not decorative, and in many applications were supplanted by the zipper. Buttons began to be made of plastics such as cellulose, polystyrene, and polyvinyl resins; designs tended to be abstract or geometric. Mass-production machines produce molded buttons either by compressing powdered plastics or by injection—forcing liquid plastic into individual molds through small openings.

Some old buttons are considered valuable and are collected for their art and workmanship. The place, date, and name of the maker are usually marked on their backs.

Originally published by: ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA

www.britannica.com/topic/button-clothing-accessory

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Pillow Arranging Made Easy

 

Martyn Bullard Adras Caravan Pillows, Schumacher Chiang Mai Dragon Drapes & Pillows
Martyn Bullard Adras Caravan Pillows, Schumacher Chiang Mai Dragon Drapes & Pillows

Thinking about adding a pop of color to your sofa?  Don’t know where to start when selecting pillows?  To some, pillow arranging can be stressful.  But it doesn’t have to be!

As you stroll down the pillow aisles of the home decor stores, you see all the beautiful colors and styles of pillows that you have to have!  But, putting a great grouping of pillows together on a sofa can sometimes be a different story.  A sofa is like a blank canvas and pillows are the pops of color, design and texture you put on it.  Getting it right can sometimes be difficult!

GuideHere are a few hints to get you started.  Start with a couple of anchor pillow, a larger sized pillow for the outside of the sofa.  Moving towards the center, start to select smaller sized pillows, alternating patterns and fabrics.

Pasha Pomegranate
Martyn Bullard Pasha Pomegrante
Pink
Dupioni Silk in Pink
Raja - Caravan
Martyn Bullard Raja Caravan

 

 

Outdoor Deck Pink Pillows

 

 

 

Pull out colors from around the room to really tie the look together.  Odd numbers are more appealing, so as you work towards the center of the sofa, end with one fun decorative pillow.

Get creative!  Try using a few patterns.  As long as they are in the same color family, they will work.

TropicalUse pillows to make a statement!  If you purchase pillow covers and down inserts you can change the pillow covers seasonally.  You can store the covers neatly in a drawer and use the inserts over and over again!

To maintain the look of your pillows, give your pillows a good shake and punch in the sides to redistribute the feathers in the insert.  Flat pillows look old and tired.

Sinhala - Bittersweet
Martyn Bullard Sinhala Bittersweet
Grass
Dupioni Silk in Grass
Hot House - Verdance
Schumacher Hot House Verdance

 

 

 

 

 

 

So the bottom line is have fun when selecting your pillows!  Pillows are an inexpensive way to change the look of your sofa without breaking the bank.  Change the look as your style changes, or change the look as the seasons change.  Need a little more inspiration?  See our custom pillow pages for a truly custom look for your sofa.  At DrapeStyle, everything we make is custom made, so if you can dream it, we can make it!

Please contact us for more information, or for a complementary catalog.


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Vern Yip now at DrapeStyle!

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Inspired by his world travels and background in architecture, Trend Fabrics and DrapeStyle.com have collaborated and are pleased to introduce the addition of Vern Yip fabrics.  Vern Yip’s global aesthetic, paired with his precise and clean lines, has set him apart as a leading trendsetter. The environments he creates are always warm, timeless and effortlessly livable.

His extraordinary technique, dynamic personality and sophisticated style have made him a nationally acclaimed interior designer, columnist and TV superstar.

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It all began with his Atlanta design firm, Vern Yip Designs, where he still works with clients from all over the world to this day. His interior design work has been award-winning, including the prestigious 2000 Southeast Designer of the Year, and he has been prominently featured in countless interior design and media publications.

Most known for his TLC show Trading Spaces and his various HGTV shows including HGTV Design Star, Deserving Design, HGTV Urban Oasis and Live at Vern’s House, and his columns in both HGTV Magazine and the Washington Post, Vern continues to provide invaluable insight into creating environments that are simultaneously beautiful and functional.

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Whether you are in the market for custom draperies, pillows or custom roman shades, you are sure to discover something from the Vern Yip Fabric Collection that will enhance your home.

DrapeStyle invites you to browse the Vern Yip Fabric Collection and discover the bright colors and bold designs for yourself.  Our designers are happy to assist you with any questions you may have 800.760.8257.

Since 2002, DrapeStyle has made the highest quality custom window treatments, right here in the USA.  Our Arizona studio employs some of the most talented seamstresses, who have an average of 25 years of experience in making custom draperies.  Please join us in the DrapeStyle experience, you will be pleased.

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Suburban Zen-Asian Inspired Spaces

From traditional to contemporary, Asian influences can be seen in all types of spaces, all over the world.  Asian inspired interiors evoke an image of serenity and tranquil calm.  Balance is often the key defining aspect of an Asian theme.

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You need the right harmony of not just colors but also different textures and elements that surround you.  Think about adding glass partitions, natural stone decorations, wooden floors, bamboo blinds and a few organic textures.  Clean lines, neutral hues, indoors and out.  Balance and harmony create a serene space in these neutral colors.

 

 

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Nature is a great inspiration in Asian influenced interiors adding to the comfort and serenity to the home.  Schumacher has many Asian inspired fabrics including Hot House Spark, Chiang Mai Dragon and Betwixt Bear/Ivory, all of which DrapeStyle carries.

 

 

Vern Yip Blue Room

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Vern Yip Blue Drapes

 

 

 

 

A home with Asian influences can be traditional or contemporary.  Traditional Chinese decor is far more opulent, expansive and grand with regal reds, lavish gold, captivating jade and plush purple tones.  Selecting the right accessories and window treatments can completely change the mood and feel of the room.  DrapeStyle carries Vern Yip fabrics that can be made into Pillows, Roman Shades and Drapes.

 

 

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Whether dramatic or understated, calming or classy, Asian themes offer an amazing way to give your home an impeccable and exclusive appeal.  DrapeStyle can help you add those finishing touches.  With over 500 fabrics to choose from, you are sure to find a color and style of window treatment to fit your home.  We at DrapeStyle love our customers and it shows.  DrapeStyle has been awarded “Best of Houzz” for customer service three years in a row.  We are here if you need a little help designing your window treatments, measuring for your window treatments or shipping fabrics samples to help you make your decision.   And as always, your Drapes, Roman Shades and Pillows will be hand made right here in the USA.  Please join us in the DrapeStyle experience-you will be pleased.

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