What Is Interlining?

imperial-drapes

It’s finally starting to cool down here in Phoenix (you know, like 60 degrees!) and it has me thinking about insulating windows from the cold.  Here is a little information about how to help with those winter heating costs:

Insulating drapery helps regulate temperature and can dampen sound. All drapery lining will give some degree of insulation, but certain linings are specifically designed for it. They can help save on heating costs by reducing drafts and heat loss during the winter, and can keep things cooler in the summer by blocking heat from the sun. Insulated drapery lining also dampens sound and can help block outside noises.

 

Flannel interlining will provide a thin layer of insulation between the lining and the fabric.  Available in a neutral color, flannel interlining will help insulate your windows from the heat and the cold as well as add body and fullness to your draperies making them look more full and luxurious. DrapeStyle uses a 100% cotton, premium, heavy-weight flannel interlining.  The flannel is loosely woven to provide a greater insulating factor and dramatically add to the fullness of your custom drapes.  You may choose to add flannel interlining and standard lining, or flannel interlining and blackout lining to your custom drapes.

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Bump interlining is particularly effective at thermal and noise insulation. Bump Interlining, or “English Bump” as it is often called is an extremely heavy-weight 100% cotton flannel interlining.  The name “English Bump” refers to its use as the home’s primary insulation in early nineteenth century England.  At more than twice the thickness and weight as our flannel interlining, bump is the perfect choice when sound and climate insulation are required.  Bump is sandwiched between the fabric and the lining.  You may add bump with your standard lining or blackout lining. Because it’s thick, bump is often used to create fuller, heavier looking draperies that have a luxurious feel.

linings stacked

 

If you are thinking about insulating your draperies and have questions, please contact us. Here at DrapeStyle everything we do is custom made so you can truly create the drapes of your dreams.  Please see our website for more ideas and inspiration, or order a free catalog. And, orders placed by the end of the month will also receive free shipping.  See website for full details.

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Blackout Lining for Drapes

Whisper Mulberry Silk, Pinch Pleat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selecting drapery lining and interlining, including blackout lining, for your new drapes, curtains or roman shades is one of the most important decisions you can make for creating the “Perfect Custom Curtain or Drape” for your home.  By adjusting your lining and interlining choices, you can create specific results for your room.  Whether you are trying to reduce light penetration, reduce external noise, save on energy costs or just wish to create a fuller bodied drape, your drapery lining choice is key.

Properly lined and well made custom drapery and roman shades can provide significant insulating benefits and reduce your homes energy usage.  Blackout lining offers exceptional UV protection.  This will protect your drapes from sun damage and keep your home cooler this summer.  It also provides complete privacy, muffles sound and lasts longer than any other window treatment.Blackout

 

 

 

 

 

 

We often refer to “Blackout Lining” as the “Boutique Hotel Look”.  Blackout lining is almost exclusively used in hotel rooms.  It blocks nearly 100% of the outside light from penetrating the drape.  Blackout lining is a synthetic material which can be very rigid (like in most hotels). There are several types and grades of blackout lining.  At DrapeStyle we use a very specific blackout lining that is extremely flexible and soft.  Blackout lining can be quite expensive.  But if you are looking for nearly complete blockage of sunlight, streetlights and UV protection, it is a great investment.

DrapeStyle only uses Hanes linings and interlinings.  Hanes is one of the oldest textile manufacturing firms in America.  While Hanes is well known for their clothing fabrics, those in the textile industry know Hanes for their high-quality linings and interlinings.  Hanes is recognized as the leader in residential drapery lining products.  Designers insist on Hanes because they know that without a high quality lining or interlining, the sun will fade and destroy any drape quickly.  A high quality lining not only makes the drape look better and feel better but it is critical to ensuring your drapes will not fade or disintegrate from the sun.

DrapeStyle is pleased to offer blackout lining for an additional $99 per drapery panel.  You may also select blackout lining for your Roman Shades for a nominal fee.  Blackout lining will more than pay for itself when you consider the amount of heat that it will deter from entering your home this summer, and the protection it will offer your other home furnishings.

Check out the website for more details or contact us directly and we would be happy to help you!

Chevron Shades

 

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Drapery 101

DrapeStyle has been awarded the Best of Houzz in Customer Service three years in a row.  That’s because we love to help out customers!  We want you to be completely satisfied with your window treatments.  And if we can help you along the way, we are happy to do so.  Feel free to contact us for a quote, fabric samples, or even if you just have a few questions.

Here are some terms that pertain to window treatments:

 

B

Bay Window: A window that protrudes outward from the main wall.  Usually comprised of a group of divided windows.

Bias: The diagonal grain in fabric.  The bias grain runs at a 45 degree angle to the straight grain and tends to stretch if pulled.

Blackout Lining: A heavy opaque material placed on the backside of the fabric blocking nearly 100% of light from penetrating through the drape.  Often used in hotels, media rooms or any application wherein privacy and darkness are required.

Blind Stitch: A sewing stitch so made as to be invisible on the right side and often nearly invisible on the wrong side.  DrapeStyle blind stitches all hems.

Box Pleats: Inverted tailored pleats which create a classical boxy look. See “Pleat Guide”.

Bracket: Attaches to the wall or ceiling and used to support a drapery rod.

Buckram: A heavy stiff fabric which is used to support or stiffen the header of the drapery panel.  Also known as “Crinoline”.

Bump Interlining: A very heavy weight interlining made of cotton flannel.  Placed between the fabric and lining for added insulation and thickness of the drape.

Flat Striped Roman Shade

linings stacked

 

 

 

 

 

C

Cascade Roman Shade: A shade constructed with evenly spaced horizontal pockets reinforced with rods.

Cartridge Pleat: A round pleat measuring 2-1/2 inches in diameter supported by a stiff paper which can be removed for cleaning.

Cornice: A decorative wooden, fabric, or foam header placed above a window to conceal drapery hardware.

Cotton: A woven fabric made of cotton yarns produced from a blend of cotton and chemical fibers or obtained by weaving cotton and mixed threads.

Crinoline: A heavy stiff fabric which is used to support or stiffen the header of the drapery panel. Also known as “Buckram”.

Curtain: Usually unlined, a curtain is a panel of hemmed fabric hung from a rod at the top of a window.

 

D

Drapability: How well fabric can fall or flow into folds.

Double Bracket: Attaches to the wall or ceiling and used to support two drapery rods.  Usually used to hang sheer drapes and decorative drapes on the same window.

Dupioni Silk: Sometimes known as dupion or douppioni, silk dupioni is a shimmering silk that is created by weaving silk threads of two different colors into a weave that seems to change colors as the silk is moved in different light. Constructed with threads made from rough silk fibers that are harvested from double cocoons or single cocoons that are spun side by side and interlocked.

 

E

End-Bracket: The brackets on each end of a drapery pole, affixed to a wall used to support the drapery pole.

End Cap: Decorative end-piece on a drapery rod.

 

F

Fan Folding: A method of folding pleated drapery into a long band to decrease or prevent wrinkles.

Finial: Decorative end-piece on a drapery rod.

Finish: Product applied to fabric as a protection against water marks and fading.

Flannel Interlining: A heavy weight interlining made of cotton flannel.  Placed between the fabric and the lining for added insulation and thickness of the drape.

Flat Pleat: Also known as a “Flat Panel” the top of the drapery panel is finished with buckram tape to keep the panel firm at the top. Drapery hooks are installed on the back of the panel which attach to the eyelets of the drapery rings.

French Door:  A door with rectangular panes of glass extending the full length. Usually hung with a pair of doors in one frame, with both doors opening outward.

French Pleat: A traditional drapery pleat which is “pinched” allowing the top part of the pleat to fan. Also known as Pinch Pleat.

Fringe: A decorative trim sewn onto the edges and hems of drapery panels.

Fullness: Refers to the width of the fabric in relation to the curtain rod or other mounting.  DrapeStyle’s draperies are made with 2 times fullness.  Sheer draperies are made with 2 ½ times fullness.

 

Ivory Rusche - TrimAdelaide-Glass-Rose-Gold

Dane Braid Tassel - Trim

 

 

 

 

 

G

Grommet: A drapery grommet is used to reinforce the holes which are cut through the fabric allowing a drapery rod to be passed through.

 

H

Hand Woven Silk: An incredibly luxurious natural silk that is hand spun on century-old looms in India. The soft texture has natural imperfections and unique weave that make it the perfect fabric for custom drapery.

Heading: The top portion of the drape which usually consists of a pleat or stiffener material.  DrapeStyle uses a standard 5” buckram heading.

Hem:  The edge or border of a garment, drape, etc., especially at the bottom.  DrapeStyle uses a standard 5” double bottom hem and 1 ½” double side hems.

Holdback: A decorative piece of hardware that holds draperies to either side of the window.

Hooks: Drapery hooks are used to connect the drape to the drapery rings. They are attached to the top back of the drape and behind the pleats. DrapeStyle only uses heavy duty long lasting steel plated drape hooks.

 

I

Inside Mount: A drapery rod or shade which attaches to the inside of a window frame.

Inverted Pleat: A neat and tailored style of pleat, similar to a box pleat.

The Linen Hotel Drape in Eggshell with Silver Banding and Inverted Pleat  Relaxed Gate Grey Roman Shade

 

 

 

 

 

J

Jamb: The interior side of a window frame.

 

K

Kravet: Established in 1918, Kravet is an industry leader in to-the-trade home furnishings. This fifth-generation family business distributes high end fabrics, furniture, wall coverings, trimmings, carpets and accessories.

 

L

Linen: A textile made from the fibers of the flax plant.  Linen is laborious to manufacture, but the fiber is very absorbent and garments made of linen are valued for their exceptional coolness and freshness in hot weather.

Lining: Fabric used as a backing for drapery. DrapeStyle’s standard lining provides body and fullness, light control, and privacy.

London Roman Shade: Gathered at the sides for a casual elegance & softness. When lowered the balloon shape is visible at the bottom of the shade.

 

M

Martyn Lawrence Bullard: Bullard is an international designer who is widely known for his eclectic and always stylish interiors, mixing period and ethnic pieces into modern environment.

Mulberry Silk: The highest quality silk available for purchase.  Mulberry silk has its history in China, where local farmers grow mulberry leaves for silkworms to feed on. The resulting cocoons are spun into raw Mulberry silk fibers.  Because the silkworms of the Bombyx mori moth are fed only mulberry leaves, the resulting silk is some of the finest available in the world.

Scarlet Mulberry Silk, Cartridge Pleat

Martyn Bullard for Schumacher

Sienna Mulberry Silk, Inverted Pleat

 

 

 

 

 

O

Outside Mount: A drapery rod or shade which attaches to the outside of the window frame.

Overlap: Refers to the size of the area that the right panel of the drapery will overlap the left panel when the draperies are completely closed. The purpose of the overlap is to ensure that the drapery panels meet properly, and that there is no separation between the two sides when the draperies are drawn. DrapeStyle uses a standard 3 ½” overlap.

 

P

Panel: A single unit of drapery comprising of one or more widths or cuts.

Parisian Pleat: A pleat style that is tacked at the top of the flute allowing the fabric under the flute to fan out.

Pattern Matching: Stripes and patterns are lined up with the repeat to produce professional looking drapes.  DrapeStyle makes every effort to pattern match draperies and Roman Shades.

Pillow/Throw Pillow: A bag or case made of cloth that is filled with feathers, down, or other soft material.  A small pillow on a chair, couch, etc., primarily for decoration.

Pleated Roman Shade: A neat and tailored style of shade that lays flat when lowered.

Polyester: A strong and durable synthetic fabric. Polyester dries quickly and can be washable or dry clean only. Polyester is often used as a blend with other fabrics to lend wrinkle resistance. It is not the easiest fabric to remove stains from, and doesn’t breathe as well as other fabrics may.

Projection: The distance from the front of the drapery rod or bracket to the wall on which it is mounted.

Puddle: When drapery panels are allowed to drape and puddle onto the floor to create a soft, full look.

 

 

R

Relaxed Roman Shade: Features a relaxed bottom of the shade and sophisticated softness while keeping the tailored look of the traditional flat roman style.

Repeat: How often the pattern is duplicated within the fabric. One repeat is one full pattern.

Return: A way to cleanly finish the top of a window treatment by enclosing the hardware and the top of the drapery.  A return is measured from the front of the rod to the wall.  DrapeStyle uses a standard 3 ½” return.

Ring: Used to hang a drape from the drapery hook onto a drapery rod.

Robert Allen:  For more than 75 years, Robert Allen has been serving the residential and hospitality design community by offering premium fabrics, luxurious furnishings and ground-breaking design services that are relevant and timeless.

Rod Pocket: A stitched pocket at the top of the drape is gathered or shirred onto a curtain rod.

Roman Shades: A Roman Shade is flat when lowered and covers the window glass completely.  It is raised horizontally through a series of cords.

 

Flat Striped Roman Shade

kirsch rings

Flat Trellis Midnight Roman Shade

S

Sateen: A tightly woven cotton fabric resulting in a smooth and shiny finish.

Schumacher: F. Schumacher & Co. is a privately held company based in New York City and Newark, Delaware, that designs high quality products for the interior design industry in the United States.

Sheers: A sheer drape is the type that allows the most light through the fabric, which also means it offers the least privacy.  May be made from natural or synthetic fibers.

Shot Tape: A small diameter cotton tube that is filled with a single line of approximately 1/8 inch lead balls to form a continuous cord.  This cord is placed in the bottom hem to add weight to the curtain.  DrapeStyle uses Shot Tape for Outdoor Draperies.

Silk: A fine lustrous fiber produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons, especially the strong, elastic, fibrous secretion of silkworms used to make thread and fabric.

Splicer: Used to connect two drapery rods together.

Sunbrella: From awnings to marine to casual furniture, Sunbrella fabrics have led the industry with extensive styles and colors while providing sun and mildew protection.

Swag: One or more pieces of fabric draped over a rod, typically used at the top of a window treatment.  Also known as a festoon.

 

T

Taffeta: Taffeta is a crisp, smooth woven fabric made from silk fibers.  The word is Persian in origin, and means “twisted woven.”  It is considered to be a “high end” fabric, suitable for use in ball gowns, wedding dresses, curtains and wall coverings.

Tassel: A pendent ornament consisting commonly of a bunch of threads, small cords, or other strands hanging from a roundish knob or head, used on clothing, in jewelry, on curtains, etc.

Tie-Back: A loop of cloth, cord, etc., which is placed around a curtain or drape to hold it open to one side.

Traverse Rod: A horizontal drapery rod in which drapes slide to open or close when pulled by cords.

 

Red Ball - Trim

Emperor Drapery Tassel Red-BronzeRed Rusche - Trim

 

 

 

 

 

V

Velvet: A type of woven tufted fabric in which the cut threads are evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it a distinctive feel.  Velvet can be made from either synthetic or natural fibers.

 

W

Weights: Drapery weights are placed just inside the hem to help the curtains stay in position and improve the fabric drape.  DrapeStyle adds drapery weights to all drapes.

Width: Refers to the width of fabric when it comes of the bolt. One width is one piece of fabric, may be any length, which can be sewn to another piece of fabric.


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Baby It’s Cold Outside! DrapeStyle Can Help!

Winter’s coming…and according to the Farmer’s Almanac, you’d better stock up on long johns and firewood.  Especially if you’re east of the Rockies, predictions are, you are going to be hit hard!  Pair that with rising energy costs, and your monthly home heating costs could go through the roof!

Here are 7 things you can do to help combat a cold house and make your thermostat happy:

 

1. Add A Down Filled Comforter

Down has always been the preferred insulator when worn or for bundling up while sleeping.  Body heat is trapped between the little fluffs of down, creating a re-generating heat source that will keep you warm all night long.  There are different weight levels available-some are even available with dual-zone comforters for bed partners with different sleeping temperature preferences! The best down originates from birds from the coldest climates, such as Hungarian or Siberian geese.  Plus, using a duvet allows you to change your room’s look easily from season to season or from one style to another without having to reinvest in a quality insert. 

2. Use A Humidifier 

Cold, winter air is notoriously dry, often leaving your home’s humidity around 10%…far short of the ideal of 30-40%  Having the correct humidity levels not only provides additional warmth to a house, but it also has many other benefits such as reducing allergens, reducing the risk of furniture damage, and controlling static electricity.

3. Change The Direction Of Your Ceiling Fans 

Most fans spin and pull air up to the ceiling.  By simply reversing the direction of your ceiling fan and pushing the rising heat back down into your living space, you can save as much as 10% on energy costs.  Ceiling too high to manually change blade direction?  This may be a good time to replace your fan with one with a built-in remote control.

Door Draft Stopper Crochet Pattern, Crochet Home Decor, Draft Dodger, Draft Excluder, Home Decor Crochet Pattern

4. Reinforce Cold, Drafty Areas 

 Windows — Take a candle or incense stick to the window on a breezy day.  Move around the frame, inside and outside of the trim, and see if the smoke moves.  If it does, you have a draft spot.  Use paintable caulk for around the trim and silicone caulk outside if you can.  There are window weatherstrips available at most home improvement stores as well.  Insulating your window draperies can help keep the draft from entering the room as well.

Doors — The old, simple solution is a draft dodger-a fabric tube filled with sand or rice that lays along the bottom of your door.  Etsy has some fun and stylish options.  The best option, however, is to replace the weather stripping around your door, including the threshold strip. 

Scarlet Mulberry Silk, Cartridge Pleat

5. Add Insulated Drapery Lining 

DrapeStyle can help with this one!  DrapeStyle offers insulated drapery lining, also called thermal lining, for all drapes and roman shades.  It’s common for drafts to come in around windows.  However, most pre-fabricated drapery panels available at most retailers, come with a simple, thin lining or with no lining at all.  DrapeStyle’s custom drapes and roman shades include lining! Let us help you select the interlining that’s best for your climate.  Interlining also adds body and weight to your drapes for a very luxurious, custom look. Our skilled workroom can add the following interlining to your drapes:

Flannel Interlining— Similar to the lightweight flannel sheets your grandma used, this supple lining goes between the face fabric and standard sateen lining.  Flannel interlining has been shown to reduce heat loss by 25%.

Bump Interlining— Originally used in Europe’s cold-climate country homes, bump interlining offers the most insulation for cold and sound.  It also gives a nice weight and drape to fine fabrics, such as silk.

6. Add Rugs To Bare Floors

Aside for the obvious (that rugs are warmer than tile or wood), wool rugs in particular are a natural insulator similar to down.  They’re hypoallergenic, provide moisture, and are incredibly durable.  Well-kept wool rugs can be handed down through generations.  Even better than an area rug would be wall-to-wall wool carpeting.

7. Get An Energy Audit

An inexpensive (often subsidized-check with your local electric company) professional test for air leaks, insulation levels and other thermal performance factors is the best way to learn where the cold is getting into your house.  They will give you tips and tricks to help keep the cold out, and often times will do the work themselves at a discounted fee.  Click here for more information on audits. 

 

So there you have it, 7 great ways to help keep the cold out this winter.  Or, you could always take up baking, not only will the heat from the oven heat up your home, but the baked goods you hand out to neighbors and co-workers will get you off of Santa’s naughty list!

 

 


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