How to Prevent Sun Damage with Window Treatments!

Sunlight can be hard on fabrics and other materials, causing color fading and ultimate deterioration of the fabric. This is bad news for some window treatments, which are often hung specifically to block bright sunlight from entering rooms and damaging the furnishings inside. While window shades and curtains protect furniture, rugs, and other items from fading, they take the brunt of the damage from the sun. It’s no surprise that window treatments are most in danger of fading and sun damage, especially when hanging from bright, sunny windows. In order to keep your window treatments looking fresh for years, choose window treatments that can stand the test of time.

If your furnishings are near or facing a window, there is a good chance that they may be damaged from the sun’s rays. Protection for your furniture is not much different than protection for your skin. Long-term exposure to sunlight can damage your furnishings similar to your skin. The sun has different effects on leather, fabric, and wood. Our window treatments will help protect not only your furnishings from the sun but yourself as well. They help filter the harsh effect from sunlight, like UV rays.

Natural light is great but can be harmful to your furnishings over time. Direct or even non-direct sunlight can cause fading, discoloration and even damage to fabric. UVA and UVB rays account for the most damage along with heat and infrared energy. Leaving windows unprotected allows UVA and UVB rays to penetrate your home and over time ruin your home furnishings.

Why does the sun bleach fabrics? It’s all down to science. There is water present in all fabrics, and the ultraviolet light from the sun catalyses a reaction between the water and the oxygen in the atmosphere, which produces hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is a bleaching agent which works by breaking down the chemical bonds that give dyes their color. As well as breaking down the color of the dye, the sun’s rays can also cause the fabric to become brittle and more prone to breakage.

DrapeStyle’s Standard Lining vs. Blackout Lining

How can you prevent fabric from fading? All fabrics will eventually fade, but there are steps you can take in order to slow the process down:

  • Tinted windows can block around 99% of harmful ultraviolet rays
  • Ensure the curtain track is wide enough so that your curtains can be pulled back from the window during the day
  • Use curtains with a good quality lining; this provides better insulation and helps to protect them from sun damage
  • Use sheer curtains during the day to keep the sun out and allow you some privacy in your home, closing your main curtains in the evenings only

Drapes and curtains are not only great for blocking out the suns rays, but they will also keep hot air out during the summer and warm air in during the winter. Before the heat of the day builds inside your room it is a good idea to close your blinds to block any sunlight and heat that may enter your home.

DrapeStyle has been providing the highest quality curtains and drapes for over 15 years. We are a family company that is committed to providing customers with high-quality service and care. We use only the highest quality linings and interlinings from Hanes. Hanes is one of the oldest textile manufacturing firms in America.  While Hanes is well known for their clothing fabrics, those in the textile industry know Hanes for their high-quality linings and interlinings.  Hanes is recognized as the leader in residential drapery lining products.   For more information on our linings, please see our lining guide.


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Best of Houzz Award 2018

DrapeStyle is proud to announce that we have been awarded “Best Of Customer Service” by Houzz for the fifth year in a row! Please read more…

January 26, 2018 – www.DrapeStyle.com of Phoenix, Arizona has won “Best of Customer Service” on Houzz®, the leading platform for home remodeling and design. The 15+ year-old custom window treatment company, was chosen by the more than 40 million monthly unique users that comprise the Houzz community from among more than one million active home building, remodeling and design industry professionals.

The Best Of Houzz is awarded annually in three categories: Design, Customer Service and Photography. Design award winners’ work was the most popular among the more than 40 million monthly users on Houzz. Customer Service honors are based on several factors, including the number and quality of client reviews a professional received in 2017. Architecture and interior design photographers whose images were most popular are recognized with the Photography award. A “Best Of Houzz 2018” badge will appear on winners’ profiles, as a sign of their commitment to excellence. These badges help homeowners identify popular and top-rated home professionals in every metro area on Houzz.

“The Houzz community selected a phenomenal group of Best of Houzz 2018 award winners, so this year’s recipients should be very proud,” said Liza Hausman, Vice President of Industry Marketing at Houzz. “Best of Houzz winners represent some of the most talented and customer-focused professionals in our industry, and we are extremely pleased to give them both this recognition and a platform on which to showcase their expertise.”

 

 

About Houzz

Houzz is the leading platform for home remodeling and design, providing people with everything they need to improve their homes from start to finish – online or from a mobile device. From decorating a small room to building a custom home and everything in between, Houzz connects millions of homeowners, home design enthusiasts and home improvement professionals across the country and around the world. With the largest residential design database in the world and a vibrant community empowered by technology, Houzz is the easiest way for people to find inspiration, get advice, buy products and hire the professionals they need to help turn their ideas into reality. Headquartered in Palo Alto, CA, Houzz also has international offices in London, Berlin, Sydney, Moscow and Tokyo. Houzz and the Houzz logo are registered trademarks of Houzz Inc. worldwide. For more information, visit houzz.com.

https://www.houzz.com/pro/drapestyle/drapestyle


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DrapeStyle- Still American Made

 

As we celebrate the Fourth of July this week, I thought I would share a couple videos showing the craftsmanship that goes into making our drapes, here in Phoenix, and the drapery hardware from one of our vendors in Los Angeles.

We are proud to say that for the past 15 years, our products are American made. From the person you speak with on the phone to place an order, to the person boxing up your order; everything is done right here in the USA.

designer drapes
Schumacher Ambroise Linen Zinc
Made in America

 

 

 

 

 

DrapeStyle offers free fabric samples, so that you can view our luxurious fabrics in your own home.  Please view our fabrics and your first $10 in fabric samples are free. If you have questions, please contact us, we are happy to help you determine the right length or width, or offer suggestions on fabrics, pleat styles and more.

We have been making custom draperies, Roman shades and pillows for 15 years. DrapeStyle custom makes everything right here in the USA by seamstresses who have an average of 25 years of experience. You won’t find better quality draperies anywhere. Please join us in the DrapeStyle experience, you will be pleased.


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The American Flag-Betsy Ross

In honor of Flag Day this week, here is some information about the first seamstress that made our first flag;

Elizabeth Griscom — also called Betsy, the eighth child and a fourth-generation American, was born on January 1, 1752.

Betsy went to a Friends (Quaker) public school. For eight hours a day she was taught reading, writing, and received instruction in a trade — probably sewing. After completing her schooling, Betsy’s father apprenticed her to a local upholsterer. Today we think of upholsterers primarily as sofa-makers and such, but in colonial times they performed all manner of sewing jobs, including flag-making. It was at her job that Betsy fell in love with another apprentice, John Ross, who was the son of an Episcopal assistant rector at Christ Church.

 

 

 

Quakers frowned on inter-denominational marriages. The penalty for such unions was severe — the guilty party being “read out” of the Quaker meeting house. Getting “read out” meant being cut off emotionally and economically from both family and meeting house. One’s entire history and community would be instantly dissolved. On a November night in 1773, 21-year-old Betsy eloped with John Ross. They ferried across the Delaware River to Hugg’s Tavern and were married in New Jersey. Her wedding caused an irrevocable split from her family.

Less than two years after their nuptials, the couple started their own upholstery business. Their decision was a bold one as competition was tough and they could not count on Betsy’s Quaker circle for business. As she was “read out” of the Quaker community, on Sundays one could now find Betsy Ross at Christ Church sitting in pew 12 with her husband. Some Sundays would find George Washington, America’s new commander in chief, sitting in an adjacent pew.

Betsy Ross was a widow struggling to run her own upholstery business. Upholsterers in colonial America not only worked on furniture but did all manner of sewing work, which for some included making flags.

Betsy would often tell her children, grandchildren, relatives, and friends of a fateful day, late in May of 1776, when three members of a secret committee from the Continental Congress came to call upon her. Those representatives, George Washington, Robert Morris, and George Ross, asked her to sew the first flag. George Washington was then the head of the Continental Army. Robert Morris, an owner of vast amounts of land, was perhaps the wealthiest citizen in the Colonies. Colonel George Ross was a respected Philadelphian and also the uncle of her late husband, John Ross. According to Betsy, General Washington showed her a rough design of the flag that included a six-pointed star. Betsy, a standout with the scissors, demonstrated how to cut a five-pointed star in a single snip.

According to Betsy Ross’s dates and sequence of events, in May the Congressional Committee called upon her at her shop. She finished the flag either in late May or early June 1776. In July, the Declaration of Independence was read aloud for the first time at Independence Hall. Amid celebration, bells throughout the city tolled, heralding the birth of a new nation.


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