Oval Office Curtains

We recently lost President H. W. Bush, and after looking at the news coverage and seeing photos from when he was in the Oval Office, I began to think about all the changes the Oval Office has gone through. Particularly the drapes. So I did some research about the Oval Office and how and why the changes come about.

Original Oval Office c. 1909

President William Howard Taft made the West Wing a permanent building, expanding it southward, doubling its size, and building the first Oval Office. Designed by Nathan C. Wyeth and completed in 1909, the office was centered on the south side of the building, much as the oval rooms in the White House are. Taft intended it to be the hub of his administration, and, by locating it in the center of the West Wing, he could be more involved with the day-to-day operation of his presidency. The Taft Oval Office had simple Georgian Revival trim, and was likely the most colorful in history; the walls were covered with vibrant seagrass green burlap.

Replica of the Oval Office during President Herbert Hoover’s era

On December 24, 1929, during President Herbert Hoover’s administration, a fire severely damaged the West Wing. Hoover used this as an opportunity to create more space, excavating a partial basement for additional offices. He restored the Oval Office, upgrading the quality of trim and installing air-conditioning. He also replaced the furniture, which had undergone no major changes in twenty years.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Congress has always been tasked with appropriating funds for the care, repair, refurnishing and maintenance of the White House and its grounds. Each incoming president has found furnishings that were worn out and in need of replacement due to everyday wear and tear. Congress approved funds enabling a new president to carry out structural improvements and purchase new furnishings from auctions, private sales and other sources, as well as occasionally authorizing the sale of furnishings that were out of repair or unfit for use.

Replica of the Oval Office during President Harry S. Truman’s era
Oval Office during President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s era

As of late, most Presidents rely on the White House collections of furniture, rugs, portraits, and objects to furnish the residence and the Oval Office.  Others, such as Presidents Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama, have declined to use the appropriated money in favor of using private funds.

Caroline and Kerry Kennedy in the Oval Office
President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office

 

 

 

 

President Gerald Ford

 

Oval Office during President Jimmy Carter’s era

Presidents have the option to have new furnishings made or reuse furnishings from past Presidencies. Furnishings are stored for future use.

President Ronald Reagan
Oval Office during President Clinton’s era

 

 

 

Installing President George W. Bush’s draperies
President Barack Obama

President Trump opted for reusing President Clinton’s draperies and President George W. Bush’s sofas.

Current Oval Office

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Jeffrey Alan Marks at DrapeStyle

 

DrapeStyle announced the addition of Jeffrey Alan Marks fabrics last month and the response has been incredible! World renowned interior designer, TV star, and author, has made his way to DrapeStyle and we couldn’t be happier!

Jeffery Alan Marks- Oceanview, Chair & Pillows

Jeffrey Alan Marks’ designs are infused with fresh informality, good nature and playful charm. Internationally recognized as one of today’s most influential American designers, this California talent captures each client’s personality to create timeless and livable interiors.

 

Jeffrey Alan Marks Fabrics

From London townhouses to Malibu beach compounds, Jeffrey’s work resonates. His thoughtful spaces are purposeful and authentic, begging to be lived in. For over two decades, his firm’s relaxed yet tailored interiors have stood apart.  Named one of “the town’s most-wanted designers” by The Hollywood Reporter, Jeffrey Alan Marks believes the design process should be fun and creative like his designs and personal style. Jeffrey studied design at the prestigious Inchbald School of Design in England and lived in Paris and Milan for many years allowing his work to draw cues from Italian and French methods.

Angelus Roman Shade

His colorful, comfortable design style translates to the atmosphere at his firm, JAM, Inc. Based in Santa Monica, the firm designs and develops luxury homes in America and the United Kingdom and develops commercial projects including restaurants and retail stores. New projects includes a chain of restaurants in Korea and exclusive eateries in New York, Montecito, and West Hollywood.

Designer Jeffrey Alan Marks

Jeffrey is included in House Beautiful’s list of the most influential decorators in American History and is on Elle Decor magazine’s A-List. His work is regularly published by major shelter magazines including Elle Decor, German Architectural Digest, and the British In Style Home. Often invited to share his design philosophy and laid-back personality, he is a favorite among worldwide television viewers and design industry forums.

Onshore Drapes, Parisian Pleats

To view his fabrics, please visit DrapeStyle.com or contact us for more information.


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