Drapery Length

Hover.  Break.  Puddle.  You probably know these words but did you know they also pertain to drapes and curtains?

Determining the length of your drapes takes a little thought.  First, ask yourself a few questions:

What is the style of the room you are having drapes made for?  Is it formal or casual?

Does this room get a lot of traffic?  You do have kids and pets constantly running through the room?  Will there be traffic going in and out of the door the drapes will be hanging from?

What kind of flooring is in this room?  Carpet?  Tile?  Wood?  What length will look best with your type of flooring?

Finishing Touch

Not only are drapes like “Jewelry”, creating the finishing touch to your room, but they can provide privacy, help with heating and cooling cost, and make your room and windows appear larger.  So it is important that we make your custom drapes the correct size.

What a difference drapes make!  

This is the same sized window; doesn’t the window on the left look so much bigger?
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Hang ’em HIGH and WIDE!

This is a trick that designers use to make the space appear larger than it is.  Your room will look taller if your drapes hang 2″ from the ceiling.  Measure 2″ below the ceiling or moulding, to the floor for your finished length.  If your space doesn’t allow you to hang your drapes this high, you can hang the drapery rod 4″ above the window moulding.  Measure from this point to the floor and this will be your finish length.

     

Next, let’s define a few terms:

Hover or Floor Length-Drapes that meet the floor:

This is the most popular option for customers to select.  Floor length drapes lend a more casual look, and are a more practical option if the drapes will be opened and closed often.  If you are using a drapery rod with rings, measure from the bottom of the drapery rings to the floor to get your finished length.

Salaam Dupioni Custom Silk Drapery

White Linen with Sand Border and Velvet Ribbon Detail

Trouser Break-Drapes break like a pair of trousers-one inch of fabric on the floor:

Trouser break drapes offer a tailored, but more casual look with that designer touch.  Take the measurement from the bottom of the drapery rings to the floor and add one inch.  All fabrics look great with this look.

Minimal Puddle-Drapes “puddle” or gather slightly on the floor:

Beautifully tailored looking drapes with a minimal puddle.  This look adds softness to a room for a more cozy feel.  Take the measurement from the bottom of the drapery rings to the floor and add 1-3″ to create this look.
 Double Bordered Dupioni in New Ivory + Cashmere Border

Moderate Puddle-Drapes with a more substantial amount of fabric gathered on the floor:

Take the measurement from the bottom of the drapery rings to the floor and add 3-6″ for a moderate puddle.  This style is more appropriate for rooms with less traffic, where you won’t be cleaning the floors often.  This lends towards a more formal look, and drapes that puddle can really help with heating and cooling loss!

Shown: Milano Lucia with Optional Emperor Tassel in Gold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opulent Puddle-A large amount of fabric gathered on the floor:

A more formal, luxurious feel.  Measure from the bottom of the drapery rings to the floor, and add 6-8″ for an opulent puddle.  This style is usually used in formal settings, perfect for drapes that won’t be opened and closed often.  For a romantic look, silk fabrics look beautiful when puddled on the floor.


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Why Add Interlining To Your Curtains and Drapes?

Drape with Bump

Interlining is a thick, soft blanket-like fabric which is sandwiched between the decorative fabric and the lining. Once you have seen and experienced curtains and blinds that have been interlined, you will want to have all of your curtains interlined!  Here’s a guide to interlining and how to use it successfully.

Flannel

•   Interlining makes curtains look luxurious and drape elegantly.  It’s the key to getting a grand, full, lush look.

•   Lined and interlined curtains absorb more sound, and provide greater insulation from cold and heat, than curtains with just lining.

•   Interlining is not just for curtains. You can also interline Roman shades.

•   Interlined curtains can’t be washed, and must be cleaned by a specialist.

•   Interlined curtains are considerably heavier than curtains that are just lined.  Make sure that your track or pole is able to take the weight.  Metal tracking is a worthwhile investment – plastic tracking may deform and perform badly under the weight of interlined curtains.

•   The interlining is held in place between the face fabric and the lining with vertical lines of loose locking stitches.  This is done by hand and adds an extra process to the making up of curtains, which adds to the cost if you are having them professionally made.

Dupioni Silk Gothic Red

Bump

A thick cotton-based fabric which drapes well.  Bump gives the most body to curtains, and is the type favored by most professional curtain makers.

Flannel

A lighter brushed cotton interlining for small curtains where heavy bump would be out of proportion.  It’s also used to interline swags and tails, pelmets and valances to give them a soft padded look, to match the interlined curtains beneath.

Interlining curtains is highly recommended for that lush, full look. It will also help with insulating your windows from the cold and heat. Take a look at the different lining options available here. DrapeStyle offers interlining on all of their curtains. For more information, or for samples of linings, please contact us.

Silk Drape with Bump

 


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Pantone Color of the Year 2019

Pantone has announced its color of the year for 2019.

Vibrant, yet mellow PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embraces us with warmth and nourishment to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment.

In reaction to the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life, we are seeking authentic and immersive experiences that enable connection and intimacy. Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral welcomes and encourages lighthearted activity. Symbolizing our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.

Representing the fusion of modern life, PANTONE Living Coral is a nurturing color that appears in our natural surroundings and at the same time, displays a lively presence within social media.

PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral emits the desired, familiar, and energizing aspects of color found in nature. In its glorious, yet unfortunately more elusive, display beneath the sea, this vivifying and effervescent color mesmerizes the eye and mind. Lying at the center of our naturally vivid and chromatic ecosystem, PANTONE Living Coral is evocative of how coral reefs provide shelter to a diverse kaleidoscope of color.

“In its glorious, yet unfortunately more elusive, display beneath the sea, this vivifying and effervescent color mesmerizes the eye and mind,” Pantone said in the news release. “Lying at the center of our naturally vivid and chromatic ecosystem, Living Coral is evocative of how coral reefs provide shelter to a diverse kaleidoscope of color.”

About Pantone Color of the Year

For 20 years, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home furnishings, and industrial design, as well as product, packaging, and graphic design.

The Color of the Year selection process requires thoughtful consideration and trend analysis. To arrive at the selection each year, Pantone’s color experts at the Color Institute comb the world looking for new color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films in production, traveling art collections and new artists, fashion, all areas of design, popular travel destinations, as well as new lifestyles, playstyles, and socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from new technologies, materials, textures, and effects that impact color, relevant social media platforms and even upcoming sporting events that capture worldwide attention.


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Oval Office Curtains

We recently lost President H. W. Bush, and after looking at the news coverage and seeing photos from when he was in the Oval Office, I began to think about all the changes the Oval Office has gone through. Particularly the drapes. So I did some research about the Oval Office and how and why the changes come about.

Original Oval Office c. 1909

President William Howard Taft made the West Wing a permanent building, expanding it southward, doubling its size, and building the first Oval Office. Designed by Nathan C. Wyeth and completed in 1909, the office was centered on the south side of the building, much as the oval rooms in the White House are. Taft intended it to be the hub of his administration, and, by locating it in the center of the West Wing, he could be more involved with the day-to-day operation of his presidency. The Taft Oval Office had simple Georgian Revival trim, and was likely the most colorful in history; the walls were covered with vibrant seagrass green burlap.

Replica of the Oval Office during President Herbert Hoover’s era

On December 24, 1929, during President Herbert Hoover’s administration, a fire severely damaged the West Wing. Hoover used this as an opportunity to create more space, excavating a partial basement for additional offices. He restored the Oval Office, upgrading the quality of trim and installing air-conditioning. He also replaced the furniture, which had undergone no major changes in twenty years.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Congress has always been tasked with appropriating funds for the care, repair, refurnishing and maintenance of the White House and its grounds. Each incoming president has found furnishings that were worn out and in need of replacement due to everyday wear and tear. Congress approved funds enabling a new president to carry out structural improvements and purchase new furnishings from auctions, private sales and other sources, as well as occasionally authorizing the sale of furnishings that were out of repair or unfit for use.

Replica of the Oval Office during President Harry S. Truman’s era
Oval Office during President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s era

As of late, most Presidents rely on the White House collections of furniture, rugs, portraits, and objects to furnish the residence and the Oval Office.  Others, such as Presidents Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama, have declined to use the appropriated money in favor of using private funds.

Caroline and Kerry Kennedy in the Oval Office
President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office

 

 

 

 

President Gerald Ford

 

Oval Office during President Jimmy Carter’s era

Presidents have the option to have new furnishings made or reuse furnishings from past Presidencies. Furnishings are stored for future use.

President Ronald Reagan
Oval Office during President Clinton’s era

 

 

 

Installing President George W. Bush’s draperies
President Barack Obama

President Trump opted for reusing President Clinton’s draperies and President George W. Bush’s sofas.

Current Oval Office

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Jeffrey Alan Marks at DrapeStyle

 

DrapeStyle announced the addition of Jeffrey Alan Marks fabrics last month and the response has been incredible! World renowned interior designer, TV star, and author, has made his way to DrapeStyle and we couldn’t be happier!

Jeffery Alan Marks- Oceanview, Chair & Pillows

Jeffrey Alan Marks’ designs are infused with fresh informality, good nature and playful charm. Internationally recognized as one of today’s most influential American designers, this California talent captures each client’s personality to create timeless and livable interiors.

 

Jeffrey Alan Marks Fabrics

From London townhouses to Malibu beach compounds, Jeffrey’s work resonates. His thoughtful spaces are purposeful and authentic, begging to be lived in. For over two decades, his firm’s relaxed yet tailored interiors have stood apart.  Named one of “the town’s most-wanted designers” by The Hollywood Reporter, Jeffrey Alan Marks believes the design process should be fun and creative like his designs and personal style. Jeffrey studied design at the prestigious Inchbald School of Design in England and lived in Paris and Milan for many years allowing his work to draw cues from Italian and French methods.

Angelus Roman Shade

His colorful, comfortable design style translates to the atmosphere at his firm, JAM, Inc. Based in Santa Monica, the firm designs and develops luxury homes in America and the United Kingdom and develops commercial projects including restaurants and retail stores. New projects includes a chain of restaurants in Korea and exclusive eateries in New York, Montecito, and West Hollywood.

Designer Jeffrey Alan Marks

Jeffrey is included in House Beautiful’s list of the most influential decorators in American History and is on Elle Decor magazine’s A-List. His work is regularly published by major shelter magazines including Elle Decor, German Architectural Digest, and the British In Style Home. Often invited to share his design philosophy and laid-back personality, he is a favorite among worldwide television viewers and design industry forums.

Onshore Drapes, Parisian Pleats

To view his fabrics, please visit DrapeStyle.com or contact us for more information.


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