Sherwin Williams Announces Color of the Year 2019

Forged by sun. Fired by desert. Introducing Cavern Clay SW 7701, the 2019 Sherwin-Williams Color of the Year. Ancient, yet fully alive. Bohemian, yet totally refined.

“We believe 2019 will be a renaissance of the 1970s — with a twist. In the coming year, we will embrace our pioneering spirits and artisan ingenuity,” says Sue Wadden, director of color marketing at Sherwin-Williams. “Our 2019 Color of the Year, Cavern Clay, embodies renewal, simplicity and free-spirited, bohemian flair.”

 

“Cavern Clay brings new life to any living space. It’s right at home with natural furnishings, including exposed floors, wood furniture, leather upholstery and worldly textiles.”


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History of Curtains

The perk of buying curtains online has not always existed. For one thing, online shopping in general depended on the invention of the Internet. Prior to that, curtains were sold in department stores and boutique shops, made at home by the textile-fanciers, and completely non-existent in the way we know them today. Take a trip through curtain history to learn more.

A Timeline of Curtain History

31st Century B.C.

From the early 3100 B.C. to the 3rd Century B.C., the great Egyptians invented curtains and used them throughout their entire rule. The very first curtains were made of animal hides and hung in doorways with hooks. However, through the years the Egyptians spun textiles from flax and linen at first, followed by wool, silk, and cotton. These were very valuable because these materials were more flexible but still provided a similar layer of warmth as that from the hides.

Seventh to Sixth Centuries B.C.

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica, another discovery of curtain panels dates back to the 6th and 7th Centuries B.C. in ruins from Olynthus civilization in modern Greece and from Pompeii and Herculaneum civilizations in modern Italy. It is suspected these people used curtain panels to divide rooms, as opposed to our traditional window treatment use.

Early and Middle Ages

Since the Early to Middle Ages are also known as the Dark Ages, there is not much proof of curtain use at this time. However, during the 6th-15th centuries, we can suspect at least the more affluent people hung curtains in doorways and over windows to keep warm. Those large castles can be quite dark, dreary, and cold!

Renaissance Era

The Renaissance (14th-17th centuries) brought life, color, and light to the everyday people. Architecture started to embrace the use of glass panes as windows, which brought in the light but also the creepers. For the first time, people were able to see directly into another’s private space. Therefore, those who lived during the Renaissance used fabrics over the windows for privacy. It is worth noting, though, that although this use sounds just like how we use curtains today, the design was still vastly different.

18th to 19th Centuries

The eastern countries of Persia, India, and China excelled at weaving silks in beautiful patterns, and in the 18th and 19th centuries, these tricks of the trade expanded through Europe and the western worlds, especially in United Kingdom, France, Holland, and Italy. During the late 19th century, the development of machinery propelled the textile industry and made way for mass production and easy accessibility for individual homeowners. The designs were big, bold, and beautiful! At this time textile designers also made use of lace to create the first edition of the sheer curtains we know and love today.

20th Century to Present

The 20th century and 21st century have proved that anything is possible when it comes to curtains. With machinery and technology making incredible advancements, people are able to design and to create nearly any style or size of curtain. Curtain panels are hung over windows for privacy, warmth, and decoration, and they are hung in large rooms as dividers. The possibilities are endless!

Need a little more information on curtains? Do you have questions about replacing your current drapes? Contact DrapeStyle, we would be happy to help you with your window treatment project!


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DrapeStyle Welcomes Designer Jeffrey Alan Marks

Designer, Jeffrey Alan Marks

DrapeStyle is pleased to introduce the addition of Jeffrey Alan Marks fabrics. World renowned interior designer, TV star, and author, has made his way to DrapeStyle and we couldn’t be happier!

Branches Drapes

Jeffrey Alan Marks’ designs are infused with fresh inforality, good nature and playful charm. Internationally recognized as one of today’s most influential American designers, this California talent catures each client’s personality to create timeless and livable interiors.

Whitecap Chair & Pillow

From London townhouses to Malibu beach compounds, Jeffrey’s work resonates. His thoughtful spaces are purposeful and authentic, begging to be lived in. For over two decades, his firm’s relaxed yet tailored interiors have stood apart.  Named one of “the town’s most-wanted designers” by The Hollywood Reporter, Jeffrey Alan Marks believes the design process should be fun and creative like his designs and personal style. Jeffrey studied design at the prestigious Inchbald School of Design in England and lived in Paris and Milan for many years allowing his work to draw cues from Italian and French methods.

Angelus Roman Shade

His colorful, comfortable design style translates to the atmosphere at his firm, JAM, Inc. Based in Santa Monica, the firm designs and develops luxury homes in America and the United Kingdom and develops commercial projects including restaurants and retail stores. New projects includes a chain of restaurants in Korea and exclusive eateries in New York, Montecito, and West Hollywood.

Designer Jeffrey Alan Marks

Jeffrey is included in House Beautiful’s list of the most influential decorators in American History and is on Elle Decor magazine’s A-List. His work is regularly published by major shelter magazines including Elle Decor, German Architectural Digest, and the British In Style Home. Often invited to share his design philosophy and laid-back personality, Jeffrey is a favorite among worldwide television viewers and design industry forums.

Onshore Drapes, Parisian Pleats

To view his fabrics, please visit DrapeStyle.com or contact us for more information.


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Happy Labor Day Weekend

Happy Labor Day from DrapeStyle!

Here is a little information about Labor Day, courtesy of Wikipedia:

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day Weekend and it is considered the unofficial end of summer.

Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. “Labor Day” was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon was the first state of the United States to make it an official public holiday. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty U.S. states officially celebrated this holiday.

Dupioni Bordered Silk Drapes in Cashmere and Graphite
Dupioni Bordered Silk Drapes in Cashmere and Graphite

DrapeStyle will be closed Monday, September 3rd.  We will be back on Tuesday to help you with your window treatment needs!  In the meantime, please browse our website for inspiration and information about the most beautiful custom drapes available today!  We can make any width or length drape in over 600 fabrics.  And with a team of talented seamstress, you are sure to receive the highest quality draperypillows and Roman shades.

If you need a little advice or would like to order fabric swatches, please let us know.

We have been in business for over 15 years, if you appreciate good design and superior quality DrapeStyle is your answer. And as always, your window treatments will be made right here in the USA.


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