Guide on How to Hang Curtains

custom roman shades and drapes
Custom Drapes and Roman Shades used to create a great window treatment together.

This was originally posted by Casa Collective.  This guide has some really good information that would be good to share.

THE NO-FUSS GUIDE ON HOW TO HANG CURTAINS

THE CURTAIN ROD

  • The standard mounting height for a curtain rod is 4″ to 6″ above the window frame.
  • The higher you install the rod, the taller the window will appear. To make a window appear taller, install the rod from 8″ above the window frame to as high as the ceiling or bottom of crown molding.
  • If you have low ceilings and want to create the illusion of greater height, install the rod as close to the ceiling as possible.
  • To allow more light to come in when the curtains are open, the curtain rod should extend a minimum of 3″ beyond the window frame on each side.
  • To make a window appear wider and more grand, extend the rod 3″ to 6″ beyond the frame on each side.
  • Generally, the rod should be no more than 1/3 wider than the width of the window. For example, on a 54″ window you can add up to 9″ on each side (54 x 1/3 = 18) . That means the curtain rod can be up to 72″ in length.
  • If you have decorative trim that you’d like to reveal when the curtains are drawn back, allow at least a 12″ extension on both sides.

WIDTH OF CURTAINS

  • If the curtains are just framing the window and won’t be opened, you only need 1-1/2 times the width of the window.
  • To ensure that the curtains look full when closed, the combined width of the panels should be 2 to 2-1/2 times the width of the window.
  • For more fullness, opt for three times the width.
  • Always round the number up when determining the width of your panels. And when in doubt, go for the wider width.

LENGTH OF CURTAINS

  • Floor length curtains should just skim the floor or hang a 1/2″ above it.
  • You could allow a break of 1″ to 3″. This break is similar to what they do for trousers. The style is great for helping to compensate for uneven floors.
  • To create a more extravagant puddling effect, allow for an extra 6″ to 9″ in length. Tuck the fabric underneath and “poof” it up. Keep in mind, each time you vacuum the floor you’ll have to readjust the puddling. And if you have pets, they love to curl up on the extra fabric.
  • To determine the measurement of floor length curtains, measure from the top of the rod to the floor. Then subtract as necessary to allow for hanging hardware. If you plan to puddle the curtains on the floor, add the additional inches needed to do so.
  • In kitchen and high traffic areas, consider choosing a curtain length that skims the window sill.

 

MORE TIPS

  • Cafe curtains should be installed halfway up the window and be parallel to the fixed horizontal mullion (the vertical bar between the panes of glass). The length should just skim the window sill.
  • It’s easier to hem curtains than to make them longer, so always round up your measurements.

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Tiebacks, Tassles, and Holdbacks Oh My!

Holdbacks to pull back draperies

 

 

Holdbacks go by several different names including medallions, tie backs and rosettes. No matter what you call them, they’re a great addition to your window treatment. Holdbacks alone can be use to create elegant swag treatments, or use them along with your drapery rods as tie backs.

When you think of traditional holdbacks tassels might come to mind. Available in any color and size, tassels are a classic way to complete the look of your drapery. Fabric tiebacks can also be used to pull back draperies and let the light in. Order fabric tiebacks in matching or contrasting colors or patterns to add interest to your draperies.

Many times drapery hardware will have matching holdbacks, or medallions. Available in wood, iron, or composite material, these are a great way to finish the look and pull your drapery out of the way.

Holdbacks, or medallions, can also be used to hang valances or drapery that will be decorative, instead of functional. Easy to install and inexpensive, you can create a unique look by using holdbacks to hang your window treatments. Or use a combination of the above.

Holdbacks can be used to hang draperies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or if you’re looking for a unique look, get creative! Re-purpose a pretty door knob or use a remnant of rope or ribbon. For kids rooms you can tieback drapes with a stuffed animal, flowers or garland.

Trim your windows with decorative or functional tiebacks, tassels and holdbacks for a finished designer look.

 

 

If you have questions please contact us for more information, fabric samples or design help. DrapeStyle has been helping customers for 15 years, design their dream drapes and we would be happy to help you too. Please join us in the DrapeStyle experience, you will be pleased.


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The American Flag-Betsy Ross

In honor of Flag Day this week, here is some information about the first seamstress that made our first flag;

Elizabeth Griscom — also called Betsy, the eighth child and a fourth-generation American, was born on January 1, 1752.

Betsy went to a Friends (Quaker) public school. For eight hours a day she was taught reading, writing, and received instruction in a trade — probably sewing. After completing her schooling, Betsy’s father apprenticed her to a local upholsterer. Today we think of upholsterers primarily as sofa-makers and such, but in colonial times they performed all manner of sewing jobs, including flag-making. It was at her job that Betsy fell in love with another apprentice, John Ross, who was the son of an Episcopal assistant rector at Christ Church.

 

 

 

Quakers frowned on inter-denominational marriages. The penalty for such unions was severe — the guilty party being “read out” of the Quaker meeting house. Getting “read out” meant being cut off emotionally and economically from both family and meeting house. One’s entire history and community would be instantly dissolved. On a November night in 1773, 21-year-old Betsy eloped with John Ross. They ferried across the Delaware River to Hugg’s Tavern and were married in New Jersey. Her wedding caused an irrevocable split from her family.

Less than two years after their nuptials, the couple started their own upholstery business. Their decision was a bold one as competition was tough and they could not count on Betsy’s Quaker circle for business. As she was “read out” of the Quaker community, on Sundays one could now find Betsy Ross at Christ Church sitting in pew 12 with her husband. Some Sundays would find George Washington, America’s new commander in chief, sitting in an adjacent pew.

Betsy Ross was a widow struggling to run her own upholstery business. Upholsterers in colonial America not only worked on furniture but did all manner of sewing work, which for some included making flags.

Betsy would often tell her children, grandchildren, relatives, and friends of a fateful day, late in May of 1776, when three members of a secret committee from the Continental Congress came to call upon her. Those representatives, George Washington, Robert Morris, and George Ross, asked her to sew the first flag. George Washington was then the head of the Continental Army. Robert Morris, an owner of vast amounts of land, was perhaps the wealthiest citizen in the Colonies. Colonel George Ross was a respected Philadelphian and also the uncle of her late husband, John Ross. According to Betsy, General Washington showed her a rough design of the flag that included a six-pointed star. Betsy, a standout with the scissors, demonstrated how to cut a five-pointed star in a single snip.

According to Betsy Ross’s dates and sequence of events, in May the Congressional Committee called upon her at her shop. She finished the flag either in late May or early June 1776. In July, the Declaration of Independence was read aloud for the first time at Independence Hall. Amid celebration, bells throughout the city tolled, heralding the birth of a new nation.


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Now Trending: Tiny Houses

This Tiny Houses trend. Simpler living in a smaller space.

Here is an informative article by Ryan Mitchell: http://thetinylife.com/what-is-the-tiny-house-movement/

“What are tiny houses? The tiny house movement? Tiny living?

Simply put, it is a social movement where people are choosing to downsize the space they live in. The typical American home is around 2,600 square feet, whereas the typical small or tiny house is between 100 and 400 square feet. Tiny houses come in all shapes, sizes, and forms, but they enable simpler living in a smaller, more efficient space.

People are joining this movement for many reasons, but the most popular reasons include environmental concerns, financial concerns, and the desire for more time and freedom. For most Americans 1/3 to 1/2 of their income is dedicated to the roof over their heads; this translates to 15 years of working over your lifetime just to pay for it, and because of it 76% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck.

So what is the alternative? One solution might be to live smaller. While we don’t think tiny houses are for everyone, there are lessons to be learned and applied in order to escape the cycle of debt in which almost 70% of Americans are trapped.

This is a growing movement, that is for sure! With international attention on CNN, AP, Guardian, Huffington Post, NBC, Oprah, PBS and so many more, the tiny house movement has helped people learn about another way to live their lives. Every month I have thousands and thousands of readers come to my site and I know other sites experience the same.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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